BBC Two Learning Zone has produced a series of video maths challenges for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3. Developed with input from our NRICH project, 3, 2, 1, Go! sees real schoolchildren solve problems given to them by sporting heroes.

There are also teachers' notes for this challenge, including suggestions for using this in the classroom and extension and support ideas.

Key Stage 3 - Football Prediction Challenge

In this 3, 2, 1, Go! video challenge, two football-mad Key Stage 3 schoolchildren, Hayden and Romario, are taken to Arsenal’s training ground. They meet Arsenal player Per Mertesacker, and are set a maths challenge related to football.

Possible uses in the classroom

Set the scene and the show the video clip up to where the challenge is given. (You can skip the introduction by starting to watch 02:00 minutes into the clip.)

The challenge is to watch the striker score penalties before predicting where he will aim his final shot.

What will the boys have to do for this challenge? You could discuss this in pairs, and share your ideas with the rest of the class.
What information and how much do they need to collect?
How would you record this information?
How would you predict the result?



Watch the rest of the programme.

What did you think about the boys’ strategy?
Did the result match their predictions?
Is this a realistic experiment?
What factors does a kicker take into account when placing his penalty?


You can try a similar challenge yourselves, recording information, analysing it and making the predictions.


What ways could you use to present your results?

Related resources

  • Finding useful and appropriate ways of recording, presenting and analysing data is very important in sport. Look at our KS3 activities Charting Success and Charting More Success which invite you to consider, analyse and discuss different ways of presenting sports data through diagrams, charts and graphs.

You might also enjoy these activities from our NRICH website, which explore some of the mathematical ideas encountered in this challenge:


Commissioned by BBC Two Learning Zone with advice from Lynne McClure (Director of NRICH, Millennium Mathematics Project, University of Cambridge), the clips were produced in collaboration with BBC Sport.